The State of Technology at the End of 2018

The State of Technology, at least in the enterprise space, is strong; consumer tech is another story, and it is time to question the dominance of big companies like Google.

Aggregators and Jobs-to-be-Done

Aggregators succeed by being the best at doing the jobs consumers want done.

Antitrust, the App Store, and Apple

Apple’s case before the Supreme Court is about standing; Apple has a strong case. That, though, doesn’t mean the App Store isn’t a monopoly — and that Apple isn’t increasingly predicated on rent-seeking.

The Experience Economy

SAP’s acquisition of Qualtrics shows how the shift in technology has changed business; it is a perfect example of using the Internet to one’s advantage.

Apple’s Social Network

Apple’s decision to stop reporting unit sales is defensible; the company, though, should provide more data to support its new growth story.

IBM’s Old Playbook

IBM has bought Red Hat in an attempt to recreate its success in the 90s; it’s not clear, though, that the company or the market is the same.

The Problem with Facebook and Virtual Reality

Virtual reality has always been destined to be less important than augmented reality, and Facebook taking a stake has never made much sense.

The Battle for the Home

Amazon, Google, Apple, and Facebook are battling for the home; what are their strengths, weaknesses, go-to-market strategies, and business models, and who is the favorite? Or does it matter?

Data Factories

Facebook and Google and other advertising businesses are data factories, and regulation will be most effective if it lets users look inside

Instagram’s CEO

The surprising resignation of Kevin Systrom and Mike Krieger should not, in fact, be surprising: this became inevitable the moment they sold Instagram to Facebook.