Defining Aggregators

Building on Aggregation Theory, this provides a precise definition of the characteristics of aggregators, and a classification system based on suppliers. Plus, how to think about aggregator regulation.

Intel, Mobileye, and Smiling Curves

Intel is buying Mobileye; it’s an acquisition that makes sense once you realize how much value there is in components.

DistroKid, The “Publisher’s Right”, Shopify’s Results

Distrokid is small, but it’s a powerful example of the how distribution is not a value-add, the implications of which European publishers have yet to learn. It’s a lesson that doesn’t just apply to media, either.

The FANG Playbook

The FANG companies — Facebook, Amazon, Netflix, and Google — are far more similar than you might think. Their rise in value is no accident, and it is connected to Aggregation Theory.

Grantland and the (Surprising) Future of Publishing

ESPN’s decision to close Grantland seems to be more evidence that there is no future outside of massive scale or one-man operations. Bill Simmons’ recent successes, though, suggest that the answer could be the exact opposite.

Facebook and the Feed

In a week where much of the Internet was all atwitter about Mobilegeddon, Google’s pre-announced algorithm change that will favor mobile-friendly sites in mobile search results, a potentially far more impactful announcement was much more of a surprise: Facebook is tweaking the News Feed algorithm. This is a big deal for publishers in particular: according […]

Daily Update: Samsung’s Retreat, The Uncrossable Curve?, Gawker Writers Seek to Unionize

Good morning, Moore’s Law really is fifty years old: the original paper was in 1965, not 1975. Ugh! On to the update: Samsung’s Retreat While I have used the smiling curve to explain the dilemma facing publishers, as I noted at the time the very concept came from the world of Asian OEM’s — Acer […]